Sunday, January 16, 2011

Fibonacci Ornaments


As a small gift and just for the fun of it I made some ornaments using the Fibonacci sequence, not by adding different or changing colors in the Fibonacci sequence but by increasing each row in the required sequence, starting with 3 stitches: 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, 34 and then reversed the sequence with decreasing rows mirroring the increase rows in reverse. Once I had 3 stitches on the needle I continued with the I-cord again. I added beads in the white ornaments in row 6, and a bit of mohair, black seed beads and fuzzy stuff in the pink one, also in row 6, just before starting the decrease rows.

For the stitch increase per row I used no mathematical formula (mathematics unfortunately not being my forte!) but found that the sequence below looks quite balanced. Please add your comment if you have a better and more balanced increase, which is probably quite easy!

How to make Fibonacci ornaments :
Use a thin, thread-like yarn (DMC 5), start with a three-stitch I-Cord.
After about 5-7 cm start with the Fibonacci sequence with 3 stitches on your needle:
Row 1: knit 3
Row 2: knit 1, M1, k1, M1, k1 (= 5 stitches i.e. 3 + 2)
Row 3: knit 1, M1, k1, M1, K2, M1, k1 (= 8 stitches, i.e. 5 + 3)
Row 4: knit 1, M 1, k1, M1, K1, M1, K1, M1, K1 M1, K1, M1, K2 (= 13 stitches, i.e. 8 + 5)
Row 5: knit 1, M1, knit 2, M1, knit 1, M1, knit 2, M1, knit 1, M1, knit 2, M1, knit 1, M1, knit 2, M1, knit 1 (= 21 stitches, i.e. 13 + 8)
Row 6:
knit 2, M1, knit 1, M1, knit 1, M1, knit 1, M1,
knit 1, M1, knit 2, M1, knit 1, M1, knit 1,
knit 1, M1, knit 2, M1, knit 2, M1, knit 1, M1,
knit 1, M1, knit 2, M1, knit 2 (= 34 stitches, i.e. 21 + 13)

2 comments:

Sarah said...

How cool is that, dear Ms. Laura!!!!! You know me...it's right up my alley. Interestingly, I see sheen elegant cocoons...those lay within earnestly awaiting for spring...morphing into glorious wings fluttering by. My needles are out, ready...Thanks for a wonderful play :D

OfTroy said...

Oh these are lovely! I love when the beauty of math is made visible --and not just seen in my minds eye.